CRONOS: The Films of Guillermo del Toro

When:
January 7, 2018 @ 5:30 pm
2018-01-07T17:30:00-08:00
2018-01-07T17:45:00-08:00

This month, The Frida Cinema presents five mesmerizing films from acclaimed Mexican auteur Guillermo del Toro!  We kick off our series with the visionary storyteller’s beautiful, genre-mashing mind-bender, 1993 horror film Cronos.

During the Inquisition in 1536, an alchemist in Mexico creates a device known as the Cronos which harnesses eternal life to whomever possesses it.  In the present, antiques dealer Jesus Gris (Federico Luppi) discovers it in an ancient statue from his antique shop alongside his granddaughter Aurora (Tamara Shanath).   While cleaning the Cronos, he accidentally activates the device which immediately makes him look younger.  Of course, such things come with a price, and it’s not long before Gris finds himself detesting sunlight and craving human blood. While struggling with this development, Gris meets the mysterious Angel de la Guardia (Ron Perlman), whose uncle, the millionaire Dieter de la Guardia, is also aware of the Cronos’ power and is eager to steal it for himself at any cost.

Winner of over 20 international awards, including Best Film (Amiens International Film Festival), Best Director (Ariel Awards, Brussels International Festival of Fantasy Film, FantastaFestival), Best Screenplay (Sitges – Catalonian International Film Festival), Best Actor (Sitges – Catalonian International Film Festival), and the acclaimed Cannes Film Festival Mercedes-Benz Award, which almost singlehandedly put the young filmmaker on the international cinema stage.

Wednesday, January 3 – 5:30pm, 7:30pm, 9:30pm
Thursday, January 4 – 5:30pm, 7:30pm, 9:30pm
Saturday, January 6 – 12pm, 2pm
Sunday, January 7 – 5:30pm

“Guillermo del Toro’s feature debut is an arch twist on the vampire tale.” –  Steven Rea, Philadelphia Inquirer

“Cronos surprises with its sophisticated and spirited look at a tale straight from the crypt.” Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

“A most startling genre piece: tender, imaginative and wholly its own.” – Trevor Johnston, Time Out