FIGHT CLUB

When:
January 9, 2019 @ 2:00 pm
2019-01-09T14:00:00-08:00
2019-01-09T14:15:00-08:00

Our January series of 20th Anniversary Screenings of some of 1999’s most iconic film classics continues with director David Fincher’s acclaimed adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk cult classic novel, Fight Club.

When a ticking-time-bomb insomniac (Edward Norton) and a slippery soap salesman (Brad Pitt) cross paths, their increasingly bizarre friendship ends up channeling primal male aggression into a shocking new form of therapy: underground “fight clubs” where men are welcome, without repercussion or judgement, to literally beat each other to a pulp.  As their concept catches on and the clubs begin popping up in every town, the two friends begin to take on even more risky and destructive stunts – all while dealing with the eccentricities of their new female cohort, the mysterious Marla Singer (Helena Bonham Carter).

Anchored by invested performances from the entire cast, a thrilling score by Dust Brothers, and Fincher’s manic yet intentional direction, Fight Club has emerged as one of cinema’s most polarizing modern masterpieces, hailed by some as one of the greatest films of the late 20th Century, and by others as an unnecessarily violent exercise in self-indulgent macho style – which ironically is in itself strong praise, and this is precisely the phenomenon that the film cleverly satirizes.

Directed by David Fincher | 1999 | 139 minutes | Rated R

Wednesday, January 9th – 2pm, 5pm, 8pm
Thursday, January 10th – 2pm, 5pm, 8pm
Sunday, January 13th – 8pm

“An outrageous mixture of brilliant technique, puerile philosophizing, trenchant satire and sensory overload, Fight Club is the most incendiary movie to come out of Hollywood in a long time. It’s a mess, but one worth fighting about.” — David Ansen, Newsweek

“Blistering, hallucinatory, often brilliant, the film by David Fincher is a combination punch of social satire and sociopathology.”  — Carrie Rickey, Philadelphia Inquirer

“A controversial satire and a contemporary classic.” — Richard Luck, Film4