The Frida Cinema

Orange County's Year-Round Film Festival

Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Directed by
John Cameron Mitchell
92
minutes

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

In honor of Hedwig and the Angry Inch‘s recent 4k restoration and Criterion Collection release, we are excited to welcome John Cameron Mitchell’s cult classic to The Frida Cinema.

Following the life of genderqueer singer-song writer Hedwig Robinson (Mitchell), an all-original soundtrack and music video-like sequences tell her story, from her childhood as a rock ‘n roll loving little boy born in East Germany to the botched sex change surgery which left her with the fleshy “angry inch” and a failed marriage. Navigating the world as an outcast while pursuing music through small gigs with her titular backing band, Hedwig is also determined to find her separated “other half” to make herself feel complete.

Proudly described by Mitchell as a “post-punk neo-glam rock musical”, Hedwig and the Angry Inch is a uniquely heartfelt, cathartic journey of identity and finding wholeness within oneself which transcends gender and genre alike.


“An eclectic assortment of original punk anthems and power ballads by Trask… With a freewheeling cinematic mosaic of music-video fantasies, animated interludes, and moments of bracing emotional realism. A hard-charging song cycle and a tender character study, Hedwig and the Angry Inch is a tribute to the transcendent power of rock and roll.”Criterion

“A personal catharsis turned communal comfort, dressed in drag.” — Chris Azzopardi, Vanity Fair

There’s some kind of pulse of sincerity beating below the glittering surface, and it may come from Mitchell’s own life story… Strange, how the movie seems to be loud, flashy and superficial, and yet gives a deeper dimension to its characters.”Roger Ebert

“Outrageously funny monologues, sight gags and hip musical jokes (at the expense of Olivia Newton-John, Whitney Houston, Phil Collins, the Captain and Tennille and bands like Kansas, Europe and Asia) that constitute a wickedly knowing critique of recent pop history… It builds into an ironic celebration of the pop impulse itself and the thrill of playing dress-up… If the glam-rock era is long gone, ”Hedwig” reminds us, its subversive spirit, which has percolated under the surface of rock culture for more than two decades, lives on.” — Steven Holden, The New York Times

Hedwig and the Angry Inch